The Georgia Tech Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics (COPE) is a premier national and resource center that creates flexible organic photonic and electronic materials and devices that serve the information technology, telecommunications, energy, and defense sectors. COPE creates the opportunity for disruptive technologies by developing new materials with emergent properties and by providing new paradigms for device design and fabrication.

Latest News

  • Professor Natalie Stingelin Elected a Materials Research Society Fellow

    COPE and GTPN member Natalie Stingelin has been elected a Materials Research Society Fellow for pivotal contributions to the application of classical polymer science tools for the efficient design and processing of organic electronic and photonic materials and devices. Congratulations Natalie!

  • STAMI Members Recognized as H-Index High Scorers

    STAMI Members and Chemistry & Biochemistry Professors Jean-Luc Bredas (COPE, GPTN) and Seth Marder (COPE, GTPN, CRĀSI) have H-index scores greater than 100, a singular feat that is achieved by few researchers.

  • 2018 STAMI Industry Partners Day

    Georgia Tech's Center for the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfaces (STAMI) held its 2018 STAMI Industrial Partners Day and Exposition on Sept. 27-28, 2018 at The Historic Academy of Medicine. The meeting featured talks from leaders in industry and academia, student presentations, and networking opportunities.

  • STAMI-COPE Professors receive DURIP Grant for Advanced Solar Cell Fabrication Equipment

    COPE, GTPN, and CRĀSI Professors Seth Marder, Zhiqun Lin, Natalie Stingelin, and Carlos Silva from the Schools of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Sciences and Engineering have received a Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) grant for equipment to establish a unique deposition and characterization station for a wide range of metal-halide perovskite materials that will allow control, with high precision, of thin-film deposition from solution in a controlled atmosphere, and enable characterization of the produced films during film formation as well as in device assemblies.